Moses Childs


Spouse: Polly Patten


Birth:

  • Date: October 23, 1812
  • Place: Berry, Orange, VT, USA

Parents:

  • Father: Childs, Parker
  • Mother: Boutwell, Betsy

Death:

  • Date: October 24, 1890

Marriage Information:

  • Spouse: Patton, Polly
  • Alternate Spouse: Patten, Polly
  • Date: July 18, 1834

Church Ordinance Data:

  • Baptism Date: December 5, 1835
  • Ordained High Priest Date: November 18, 1860 Officiator: Gardner, George

Temple Ordinance Data:

  • Endowment Date: July 26, 1862
  • Sealed to Parents Date: July 21, 1921

Sealed to Spouse

  • Date: July 26, 1862
  • Temple: Endowment House in Salt Lake City

Places of Residence:

  • 1860; Paragonah, Iron, UT, USA

Vocations:

  • Farmer

Comments:

  • In 1870, Moses had a real wealth of $1000 and a personal wealth of $500.
  • In 1860, Moses lived in a household of 7 and had a real wealth of $250 and a personal wealth of $500.

Source Reference Red Text is in question or error!


Biographical Sketch by Hannah Leonora Childs in her writing in a composition notebook in the possession of Woodrow Weight in 1997)

History of Moses Childs

Moses Childs son of Parker or Parker Henry Childs and grandson of Samuel and Sarah Childs was born 23 Oct 1812 at Barre, Orange Co, Vermont accounting to his own statement at the endowment house in S.L.C. where he was endowed and sealed by Thomas Decker 26 July 1862, to Polly Patten, daughter of Archibald Patten and Abigail Sailsbury, whom he had married at Orleans, Jefferson Co., N.Y., July 1834. Moses was baptized 5 Dec 1835 at Jefferson Co., N.Y., the year following his marriage.

In tracing genealogy of this line of the Childs family, we have not been able, after long years of research, to yet establish where Samuel Childs was born or died or that of his wife Sarah. These is no record yet found, because of the difference in the past records and the present ones, as to the real Barre, place of grandfather's birth. At the library in New York they said it was Barre, Washington Co. N.Y. But in Colliers World Atlas and Gazetteer I find in a small circumference of Orange Co. and Washington Co. Vermont there are five Barre's. So I wrote the town register about this and he told me at one time there were that many Barres and there still is the Barre Transfer. But the city Barre proper, is now at Washington Co. Vermont. So these changes are very likely to make research very complicated, therefore we still are trying to trace this real family line.

Since grandfather and grandmother were married and lived in N.Y. it is very evident that they there first heard the L.D.S. gospel preached and started their long journey to the West, which was first to Kirtland, Ohio, thence to Nauvoo, Illinois, but because of his poor health and poor circumstances he did not effect that result until the fall of 1844 when he reached Nauvoo after the martyrdom of the prophet and patriarch Joseph and Hyrum Smith. He had traveled entirely by wagon that ten years determined to reach the appointed place of the gathering of the chosen people of god.

During that ten years of journeying, he did not spend two winters in any one house.

In the memorable exodus of the Saints from Nauvoo in Feb. 1846, his wagon was the last that crossed the Mississippi river on the ice before its breaking up. They shared in all the sufferings and afflictions during all that long journey. As grandfather was a blacksmith and a wheelwright the company shipped by water as far as they could equipment for his use. With his company and while camped for the night his eighteen year old daughter, Abigail, went to the brook (as they called it.) for a bucket of water. On the opposite side of the stream a young man with a hose came up and the two conversed there for about one-hour. The following morning grandfather was detained for some repair work and therefore was amongst the last to journey on. As they crossed this stream they there saw a new grave, that of this young man with whom Abigail had talked to the evening before. He had taken the cholera and died during the night. (This was given to me by Abigail's son, John Warrren, but he did not remember the young man's name.)

Moses Childs was always of feeble health, but extremely industrious and ambitious, in some line of mechanism, and built during his thirty eight years in Springville. Two upright saw mills, two circular saw mills, one grist mill, two cider mills and six molasses mills. He made and sold molasses and purchased six chairs, one of the first--sets in Springville. He also made and sold cider vinegar, which was real apple vinegar. He made wine and had a small keg in his cellar when he died that was ten year old, and grandmother opened it and gave all her family a taste of his last wine.

His home was a room frame house (log cabin) made of wood of his own labor. He sawed the lumber and lathe, made his own nails, and helped make the adobe's. He also hauled the rocks that made the cellar under this house which had two stairways to it--one that went down from the kitchen, the other, from the outside, where there was always stored, potatoes, vegetables, pork, molasses, vinegar and things that would freeze during the winter.

There was a porch on the back with a surface well, and clinging vine as grandfather was very industrious in the vegetable kingdom and also raised his own gourds, that were sometimes used to drink out of. Their pantry had a board sick, with a aboard pipe which he made, and it was water tight. The pipe went through the wall and emptied into a barrel, to save grandmother from carrying out water--a very modern concern for pioneer days. He also had a large granary with woodshed attached to one side and an implement shop on the other showing his neatness and order of caring for his necessities for labor. He had an adobe barn built to the square with the upper story built of lumber; a small chicken coop; and a pig pen--all done by his own labor. He also had a blacksmith shop and there did much work such as shoeing horses making nails, sharpening tools etc.

He owned one of the first buggies in Springville. It was so elevated that grandmother had a three step, step ladder to climb into it. In her later days. He helped stock Springville with various kinds of seeds that he sent East for and tried out to see their results. He planted a maple tree in front of his house that he and grandmother tapped and drew out the juice and boiled down to syrup and sugar as I have seen and tasted the same when a child. I also watched each morning for grandfather to come to his work with a small team and light wagon as he passed each day to his field, where I also saw his saw mill and its workings, and remember the large water wheel, and saw, going p and down. He was fond of pets and had a got Shep that would do tricks for him, also a cat he had trained. He was spiritually gifted and one time brought a litter and gave it to my mother and said, this is a love letter but don't you worry, there is a better one for her (meaning me). And in that letter the fellow ask me to marry him, but I never did. He also did tell many things that did come to pass

When the grasshoppers were so thick, he had his corn eaten off twice, On the 3rd day of July he planted it the third time, and the people told him he would lose all he had and have no seed for the next year, he said it would grow, and it did and harvested him a good crop.

He was a model of reliability, honesty, and punctuality. His word was as good as his bond and he figured much in a spiritual way in his family, friends and associates. He was known as a seer and prophet. Though took no part in a public way. He was very quiet reserved in manner, yet steadfast and true. His father Parker Childs born 1781 married Betsy Boutroul 9 Jan 1812. They had six children four girls and two boys, Besty died about 1823 at Orleans, Jefferson Co. N.Y. Daughter of James Boutrane and Deborah Haggett. Parker Childs and a second wife Sophia Elmer about 1825 daughter of Benjamin Elmer and Mrs. Lucy Elmer and they had eight children grandfather being the eldest of fourteen children. Moses Childs was ordained a high priest 18 Nov 1860 by Geo Gardner.

He arrived in S.L.C. with the 9th company of emigants with is family, five oxen, three cows, and one wagon with John D. Parker's company and Isaac M. Stewart over first ten in Sep 1852 (This was taken from record in Historical Library S.L.C. from Deseret News of 18 Sep. 1852. Grandfather died 24, Oct 1890. One day after his birthday and he had said he would live to see his 78 birthday he is interred in Evergreen Cemetery with his three sons and wife.


The above was copied(?) under the following title


History

of

Moses Childs

Pioneer

Came to Utah in 1852

Filed by his Great Granddaughter

Anna Beardall

  • of Camp Hobble Creek
  • Daughters of Utah Pioneers
  • Utah County
  • Springville, Utah

Anna Beardall included the following:

Material added by Myrtle Childs, granddaughter of Moses Childs, February 6, 1970.

Grandfather Moses Childs was of a refined, retiring and prophetic nature. He could give very good sage advise to peopIe who many times sought his help and guidance. He was a city councilman at one time serving a two year term, also a member of the Horticulture club of Springville. He held offices and was very active in this organization.

They were responsible for bringing into Springville many new and better seeds, trees and plants. Young sugar maple trees brought into Springville and planted on Orlo's home lot. We stitl have descendants of them. These trees are over one hundred years oId. He used to tap these trees each February ond make very good maple sugar and maple syrup.

He was very interested in expanding Springville's boundories. He helped his sons to establish themselves on farms in southeast Springville, called Sagecreek (This information from minutes of this club in the possessior of Aaron Menderhall). He had a beautiful mulberry tree, he sent for in front of his home. The berries were large and and juicy. They were enjoyed by many who passed by and stopped to gather them from the ground that was covered at bearing time.

He was very kink to his children and grandchildren. He was also very kind to his animals, his team of horses were trained and trusted to take him out to his farm. The lines were laid over the dash board and the horses knew their way so weIl they went without guidance. (No automobiles at this time.) Grandmother usea to worry about them getting frightened and running away with him.

Grandfather homesteaded land in southeast Springville, Utah, with his sons Moses DeVere, Parker Adelbert, and Archibald Orlo. They grubbed sage brush from the land and obtained it for two dollars an acre from the government. They tell that Hobblecreek channel was in this area at one time making this ground very rocky. Stephen Dallin said "he planted seeds with a shot gun out here."

Many pieces of land up Tenth South ard Fourth East have his name on the original deeds. I haue seen this when these pieces of ground have exchanged ownership. He stepped off and opened up the Tenth South road going East. It is by survey a few 2 or 3 rods north of where it should be. He with his sons gave many hours to helping to build up this part of the town. His youngest son Orlo's home still occupies some of this land, now in the name of Myrtle Childs, the tenth chilh of Orlo.

He wanted to name and bless his grandsons. He is said, to have asked to name James B. Childs. B. could stand for Burrastor or Boutwell but mosty big boy. I never saw this grandfather or grandmother but I did pass many times their home and remember going into it.

Their home was owned by a daughter Susan Noakes. She, needing money, sold it to Israel Clegg, a son-in-Law. He rented it to some of his own children. CIegg's youngest daughter, Ida CIegg Bird, lived in it from 1920 to 1929. They tore it down and the adobes and wood rafters were built into the present home they live in.

The old cotton wood tree was cut down because they feared it was rotted. But when it was down the heart of it was very hard.

The upstairs of the home was never completely finished. There were windows and a floor and beds could be put in it. He also made the dobbies that Iined the home. I remember a picket fence around it. Grandfather gathered wood from the mountains and lumber and shingles was made in his saw mill which was on the bank of Hobble Creek. This mill was on the property owned by Amot Cherrington and Dewey Bird (1970). This property at one time was owned by Orlo and Moses Childs.


MOSES CHILDS

(Polly Patten)

  • Born: 23 October 1812
  • Place: Barre, Washington, Vermont
  • Married: July 18, 1834
  • Place: Orleans, Jefferson, New York
  • Died: 24 October 1890
  • Place: Springville, Utah, Utah
  • Baptized: December 5, 1835
  • Entered the Salt Lake Valley: August 28-September 22, 1852. He was 40 years old.

Pioneer Company 57-Isaac M. Stewart (9) left Kanesville Iowa, June 19 with 245 people and 53 wagons. Arrived August 28-September 18, 1852. He arrived with the 9th company of emigrants with his family, five oxen, three cows and one wagon with John D. Parker's company, and Isaac M. Stewart over first ten in September 1852.


(Children)

1. Abagail Ardilla Childs 12 March 1835 Wilma, Jefferson, New York

2. Betsy Arthusa Childs 14 January 1837 Wilma, Jefferson, New York

3. Susan Amelia Childs 5 March 1839 Mexico, Oswego, New York

4. Eunice Rosetta Childs 23 May 1842 Mexico, Oswego, New York

5. Moses DeVere Childs* 18 July 1847 Mt. Pisgah, Pottawathomie, Iowa

6. Polly Berthena Childs 3 November 1849 Pisgah, Pottawathomie, Iowa

7. Parker Adelbert Childs 7 February 1852 Honey Creek, Pottawathomie, Iowa

8. Archibald Orlo Childs 17 October 1855 Springville, Utah, Utah


(Taken from the L.D.S. Collectors Library 1997, Bonus Disk)

Childs, Moses (Male)

Birth: Date: October 23, 1812, Place: Berry, Orange, Vermont, USA

Parents: Father: Childs, Parker, Mother: Boutwell, Betsy

Death Date: October 24, 1890

Marriage Information: Childs, Moses (Male)

Spouse: Patton, Polly

Alternate Spouse: Patten, Polly

Date: July 18, 1834

Church Ordinance Data: Childs, Moses (Male)

Baptism Date: December 5, 1835

Ordained High Priest Date: November 18, 1860, Officiator: Gardner, George

Temple Ordinance Data: Childs, Moses (Male)

Endowment Date: July 26, 1862

Sealed to Parents Date: July 21, 1921

Sealed to Spouse Date: July 26, 1862, Temple: Endowment House in Salt Lake City

Places of Residence: Childs, Moses (Male) 1860; Paragonah, Iron, Utah, USA

Vocations: Childs, Moses (Male) Farmer

Comments: Childs, Moses (Male)In 1870, Moses had a real wealth of $1000 and a personal wealth of $500. In 1860, Moses lived in a household of 7 and had a real wealth of $250 and a personal wealth of $500.


(Biographical Sketch by Hannah Leonora Childs in her writing in a composition notebook)

History of Moses Childs

Moses Childs son of Parker or Parker Henry Childs and grandson of Samuel and Sarah Childs was born 23 October 1812 at Barrey Orane County, Vermont according to his own statement at the endowment house in Salt Lake City where he was endowed and sealed by Thomas Decker 26 July 1862, to Polly Patten daughter of Archibald Patten and Abigail Sailsbury whom he had married at Orleans, Jefferson County New York July 1834. Moses was baptized 5 December 1835 at Jefferson County NewYork the year following his marriage.

In tracing genealogy of this line of the Childs family we have not been able after long years of research to yet establish where Samuel Childs was born or died or that of his wife Sarah. There is no record yet found, because of the difference in the past records and the present ones as to the real Barre, place of grandfathers birth. At the library in New York they said it was Barre, Washington County New York, but in Colliers World Atlas and Gazetteer I find in a small circumference of Orange County and Washington County Vermont there are five Barre's. So I wrote the town register about this and he told me at one time there were that many Barres and there still is the Barre Transfer. But the city Barre proper, is now at Washington County Vermont. So these changes are very likely to make research very complicated, therefore we still are trying to trace this real family line.

Since grandfather and grandmother were married and lived in New York, it is very evident that they there first heard the L.D.S. gospel preached and started their long journey to the west, which was first to Kirtland, Ohio thence to Nauvoo Illinois, but because of his poor health and poor circumstances he did not effect that result until the fall of 1844 when he reached Nauvoo after the martyrdom of the prophet and patriarch Joseph and Hyrum Smith. He had traveled entirely by wagon that ten years determined to reach the appointed place of the gathering of the chosen people of god.

During that ten years of journeying, he did not spend two winters in any one house.

In the memorable exodus of the Saints from Nauvoo in February 1846 his wagon was the last that crossed the Mississippi River on the ice before its breaking up. They shared in all the sufferings and afflictions during all that long journey. As grandfather was a blacksmith and a wheelwright the company shipped by water as far as they could equipment for his use. With his company and while camped for the night his eighteen year old daughter, Abigail, went to the book (as they called it) for a bucket of water. On the opposite side of the stream a young man with a hose came up and the two conversed there for about one-hour. The following morning grandfather was detained for some repair work and therefore was amongst the last to journey on. As they crossed this stream they there saw a new grave that of this young man with whom Abigail had talked to the evening before. He had taken the cholera and died during the night. (This was given to me by Abigail son, John Warrren, but he did not remember the young man's name.)

Moses Childs was always of feeble health, but extremely industrious and ambitious, in some line of mechanism, and built during his thirty eight years in Springville: two upright saw mills, two circular saw mills, one grist mill, two cider mills and six molasses mills. He made and sold molasses and purchased six chairs, one of the first sets in Springville. He also made and sold cider vinegar, which was real apple vinegar. He made wine and had a small keg in his cellar when he died that was ten year old, and grandmother opened it and gave all her family a taste of his last wine.

His home was a seven room frame house made of wood of his own labor. He sawed the lumber and lathe, made his own nails, and helped make the adobe's. He also hauled the rocks that made the cellar under this house which had two stairways to it--one that went down from the kitchen, the other, from the outside, where there was always stored, potatoes, vegetables, pork, molasses, vinegar and things that would freeze during the winter.

There was a porch on the back with a surface well, and clinging vine as grandfather was very industrious in the vegetable kingdom and also raised his own gords, that were sometimes used to drink out of. Their pantry had a board sink, with a board pipe which he made, and it was water tight. The pipe went through the wall and emptied into a barrel, to save grandmother from carrying out water--a very modern concern for pioneer days. He also had a large granary with woodshed attached to one side and an implement shop on the other showing his neatness and order of caring for his necessities for labor. He had an adobe barn built to the square with the upper story built of lumber; a small chicken coop; and a pig pen--all done by his own labor. He also had a blacksmith shop and there did much work such as shoeing horses making nails, sharpening tools etc.

He owned one of the first buggies in Springville. It was so elevated that grandmother had a three step, step ladder to climb into it. In her later days. He helped stock Springville with various kinds of seeds that he sent east for and tried out to see their results. He planted a maple tree in front of his house that he and grandmother tapped and drew out the juice and boiled down to syrup and sugar as I have seen and tasted the same when a child. I also watched each morning for grandfather to come to his work with a small team and light wagon as he passed each day to his field, where I also saw his saw mill and its workings, and remember the large water wheel, and saw, going up and down. He was fond of pets and had a got Shep that would do tricks for him, also a cat he had trained. He was spiritually gifted and one time brought a letter and gave it to my mother and said, this is a love letter but don't you worry, there is a better one for her (meaning me). And in that letter the fellow ask me to marry him, but I never did. He also did tell many things that did come to pass

When the grasshoppers were so thick, he had his corn eaten off twice, On the 3rd day of July he planted it the third time, and the people told him he would lose all he had and have no seed for the next year, he said it would grow, and it did and harvested him a good crop.

He was a model of reliability, honesty, and punctuality. His word was as good as his bond and he figured much in a spiritual way in his family, friends and associates. He was known as a seer and prophet. Though took no part in a public way. He was very quiet reserved in manner, yet steadfast and true. His father Parker Childs born 1781 married Betsy Boutroul 9 January 1812. They had six children four girls and two boys, Besty died about 1823 at Orleans, Jefferson County New York Daughter of James Boutrane and Deborah Haggett. Parker Childs married a second wife Sophia Elmer about 1825 daughter of Benjamin Elmer and Mrs. Lucy Elmer and they had eight children grandfather being the eldest of fourteen children. Moses Childs was ordained a high priest 18 November 1860 by Geo Gardner.

He arrived in Salt Lake City with the 9th company of emigrants with his family, five oxen, three cows, and one wagon with John D. Parker's company and Isaac M. Stewart over first ten in September 1852 (This was taken from record in Historical Library Salt Lake City from Deseret News of 18 September 1852. Grandfather died 24, October 1890. One day after his birthday and he had said he would live to see his 78 birthday he is interred in Evergreen Cemetery with his three sons and wife.


(Taken from "Perfection Through Sorrow" by Bessie W. Stephens)

In Springville, Utah I grew up in a home filled with love, and respect for my ancestors. In our front room were two beautiful picture frames of dark wood with two inch border of silver leaves beautifully raised in an intricate design on a black background. Around the picture was a one inch border of smaller delicate leaves. These two beautiful frames contained pictures of my great grand father, Moses Childs and my great grandmother, Polly Patten Childs. They seemed to give their approval on the things that went on inside the home. Their countenance was benevolently aglow as I gazed into their twinkling dark eyes. I adored these two pictures and decided to find out more about my great grand parents.

Moses, my great grandfather, was a son of Parker Childs and Betsy Boutweel. He was born Oct. 23, 1812 in Barry, Orange County, Vermont. He was baptized into the church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. In 1834 in New York. He had been married in July 1834 in Orleans, Jefferson County New York.. He died October 24 at the age of 78 in Springville, Utah. He was buried in the Evergreen Cemetery in Springville.

His wife Polly Patten was a daughter of Archibald Patten and Abigail Sailsbury. She was a niece of David Patten who was martyred at Crooked River. She was born December 27, 1814 at New Port, Herkemer County, New York. She died February 4, 1897 in Springville, Utah and was buried in the Evergreen Cemetery in Springville, Utah.

After Moses was baptized he commenced his preparations to journey to the gathering place of the Saints which was then at Kirtland, Ohio.

Moses had poor health and this hampered him considerably in his efforts to leave New York. They traveled by wagon for ten years. During this time they did not spend two winters in any one house. They finally reached Nauvoo in the fall of 1844 where the Saints were gathered.

They lived here for two years.

Through the gathering of converts from Great Britain as well as from various parts of the U.S., Nauvoo had become the foremost city of Illinois. It has risen from a swamp and wilderness in 1839 to a common wealth of some 20 thousand souls.

But the rising tide of persecution the saints endured made it inevitable that they would have to seek a new home in the wilderness. In January 1844. It became necessary to increase the police force for the protection of the city because of threats of mob vengeance from both Missouri and Illinois. Information was sent to President Tyler of the U.S. acquainting him with the danger and asking for protection. Nauvoo was placed under martial law, and the legion mustered into service in self defense. The Prophet stood before them in his uniform as lieutenant general and addressed them at length, in defense of their liberties.

On June 16, Joseph wrote Governor Ford, calling his attention to the mob. Meetings at Carthage and Warsaw, and the threats made to exterminate the Saints.

All of this was to no avail and Joseph and Hyrum were shot by a mob at Carthage Jail on June 27, 1844.

The charter of Nauvoo was repealed by the legislature in January 1845.

In the Quincy Whig it stated "It is a settled thing that the public sentiment of the state is against the Mormons:, and it will be in vain for them to contend against it; and to prevent bloodshed, and the sacrifice of many lives on both sides, it is their duty to obey the public will and leave the State as speedily as possible. That they will do this we have a confident hope and that too, before the next extreme is resorted to-that of force." Essentials in Church History page 395.

During the fall & winter months preparations went steadily on for the removal of the entire body of the Latter-day Saints in the spring.

In the memorable exodus, of the Saints from Nauvoo in February 1846, my great grandfather's wagon was the last wagon to cross the Mississippi Riven on the ice before its' break up.

How did these two years effect Moses Childs? He was in poor health when he arrived in Nauvoo. So he had many sick spells but managed to live through many hardships. Great Grandma Polly had four children when they left Nauvoo in February 1846. She was four months pregnant with my grandfather.

They all shared in all the sufferings, afflictions, and privations during the trip in their wagon.

On the 18th of May President Young and several of the apostles reached the middle fork of Grand River, some 27 miles west of Garden Grove. Parley P. Pratt had called the place Mount Pisgah, Iowa & here it was decided to make another settlement for the Saints. Here it was that my grandfather, Moses DeVere Childs, was born on July 18, 1847 as well as Polly Berthenid November 3, 1849. Parker Adelbert was born at Honey Creek, Iowa February 27, 1852.

My mother heard my great grandmother tell her how they gathered buffalo chips for the fire and how they would par boil their bacon and save the water so they could skim off the grease that would rise on top of the water. This they would use to grease the bake oven. They arrived in Springville in 1852.

Polly spun and wove all their cloth and then she sewed all the clothes by hand. Her lot was hard.

Their last child Archibald Orlo was born in Springville, October 17, 1855. Here they lived as pioneers enduring many privations and illnesses.

Moses Childs was always of feeble health and poor constitution, notwithstanding which he was extremely industrious and ambitious in some lines of mechanism; and built during his 38 years of usefulness in Springville, Utah

2 upright saw mills,

2 circular saw mills,

one grist mill,

2 cider mills, and

6 molasses mills.

He was a model of reliability, honest and punctuality; and yet as a spiritual man or a man of spiritual gifts, he never figured much in a public way.

But in his family, in his neighborhood, among his intimate friends, and confidential associates he was known to be a Seer and Prophet. He peacefully fell asleep in death on the 24th of October making him 78 years and one day old at his death. (History of Springville).

Copyright 1996 - 2018 Shirl R Weight Thursday, 18 January 2018 12:56:06 PM