James Craig Walker


Spouse: Elizabeth Griffiths

  • Born August 20, 1833 at Glasgow, S. Scotland
  • Baptized on September 11, 1850
  • Married on January 1, 1860
  • Died February 25, 1900 at Union, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Arrived in the Salt Lake Valley September 30, 1854. (Age 21)
  • Buried: Murray City Cementary, Salt Lake Co. Utah

James Craig Walker born 20 August 1833, Glasgow Scotland. He received the gospel in his native land in his 17th year and was baptized in the river Clyde. He emigrated to Utah arriving in Salt Lake City 30 September 1854. He never knew of any of his relatives coming to America.

He lived in Union Fort for a while and taught school there for a short time in an adobe room built for a meeting house.

He met my mother Elizabeth Griffiths and they were married January 1, 1860. They were sealed in the endowment house 5 April 1862. In early days the Endowment House was only open at times as there was not enough work to keep it open all the time.

My father understood two good trades, flour milling and dying cloth. His father ran a dye house in Glasgow. My Father had excellent taste in shades of color. When I was a little girl he colored some yarn to make me a flannel dress they were lovely plaids and very pretty. His mother died when he was five years old and he grew up under the care of a step mother.

My mother Elizabeth Griffiths was the daughter of Joseph Griffiths and Ann Roberts who emigrated from England. My mother was born 25 July 1843 Nauvoo, Hancock Co. Illinois. She was the first born of 15 children among them were 5 pair of twins.

My grandfather and grandmother viewed the dead bodies of our beloved Prophet Joseph and his brother Hyrum after they had been martyred at Carthage Jail.

My grandmother often told of the awful sadness theat prevailed among the saints as their love was so great for their beloved leaders who had been murdered in cold blood. They were afterward buried secretly.

My father being a miller, the family moved from the Fort to a mill owned by Brigham Young in City Creek Canyon. We lived there for a time then moved to the city two doors west of the Great Salt Lake Theater.

One Sabbath morning my little sister and I went out of the gate and were lost. We were tired of waiting for our father to go to Sunday School. We wandered west to the old adobe yard some people took us in and questioned us. My father had written out a description of us and sent it to meeting and we were found. This little incident caused me to remember the bowery made to hold meetings in when the Saints first came to the Valley

We moved next to the Jordan Mill now called Murray.

My mother now had four children and while there gave birth to a pair of twins boy and a girl. Nearly losing her life, it was here in the Stream running by the door, I was baptized by my Father, 1 May 1870 and confirmed by an Elder Farburn. I was now nine years old.

I well remember going to Sabbath school. Father was one of the Superintendents of the Sunday School of the Mill Creek Ward .

This was one of the joys of my childhood. I attended the first day of school wile living here. One half mile from home in an adobe room built for day school. My sister went with me.

Our next move was to Millers Mill the ward called South Cottonwood. My next school was at a private house taught by a lady teacher. We went from there to the school house on the hill taught by Sam Brinton. My mother in ill health. I was kept out of school two week at a time, this caused me to loose interest in my studies and I learned but little. All of the grades were taught in this little room. I remember we stood in a row and in turn read a verse, we were furnished if found writing out of the time for writing. My father ran the flour mill owned by James R. Miller. He was very kind to my father’s family and so was his wife Mary.

The saddest trial of my life happened while we ere living there. My dear mother gave birth to her seventh child and for the lack of skillful help she died in ten days after the birth of the child of blood poisoning. You can imagine the dreadful condition of things at that time, our dear sweet mother lay cold in death, seven children, motherless, my father, poor and working hard for a living.

We had no home then. We were living in the mill house, in two small rooms.

Just before my mother died she called me to her and said "be a good a girl" and kissed me. Those dying words has always prompted me to try to do right. She died a seven o clock in the morning.

The sweet soul was dressed in the best they had, not silk or satin but clean and white, dressed in the Temple robe it was made of linen. She was laid in a casket and placed in a wagon box.

The journey to the cemetery was four miles. We stopped at Union Fort and held the funeral. One hymn I remember was "Sweet rest in Heaven"

She was taken to the Union graveyard and buried there.

The little infant lived three months and died.

My father married again to Harriet Ann Pearce, her husband was killed in the canyon log rolling on him. She had three children and after my father married they had four children two of them died. And two are living yet. After a time I went to live with my Aunt Mary, my mother’s sister. Mary and Jo Harker at Vernon, Tooele County(Utah).


JAMES CRAIG WALKER

(Elisabeth Griffiths)



  • Born August 20, 1833
  • Place: Glasgow, S. Scotland
  • Married: January 1, 1860
  • Place: Union, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Died: February 22, 1900
  • Place: Union, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Baptized on September 11, 1850
  • Arrived in the Salt Lake Valley September 30, 1854. He was 21 years of age.

Darwin Richardson (3) (P.E.F.) Left Westport, Missouri 17 June with 300 people and 40 wagons, arrived 30 September Roster, Journal History 31 December 1854, Supplement, p.10.


(Children)

1. Mary Ann* 6 Dec 1860 Union, Salt Lake, Utah

2. Elizabeth 20 Feb 1863 Union, Salt Lake, Utah

3. James Lee 12 Sep. 1865 So. Cottonwood, Salt Lake, Utah

4. Joseph Alma 12 Jan 1868 Mill Creek, Salt Lake, Utah

5. Ellen Elena 13 Mar 1870 Big Cottonwood, Salt Lake, Utah

6. William Hay 14 Mar 1870 Big Cottonwood, Salt Lake, Utah

7. Olive 6 Apr 1872 So. Cottonwood, Salt Lake, Utah


(Written by Mary Ann Walker Ball)

James Craig Walker born 20 August 1833, Glasgow Scotland. He received the gospel in his native land in his 17th year and was baptized in the River Clyde. He emigrated to Utah arriving in Salt Lake City 30 September 1854. He never knew of any of his relatives coming to America. He lived in Union Fort for a while and taught school there for a short time in an adobe room built for meeting house.

He met my mother Elizabeth Griffiths and they were married January 1, 1860. They were sealed in the Endowment House 5 April 1862. In early days the Endowment House was only open at times as there was not enough work to keep it open all the time.

My father understood two good trades, flour milling and dying cloth. His father ran a dye house in Glasgow. My Father had excellent taste in shades of color. When I was a little girl he colored some yarn to make me a flannel dress they were lovely plaids and very pretty. His mother died when he was five years old and he grew up under the care of a step mother.

My mother Elisabeth Griffiths was the daughter of Joseph Griffiths and Ann Roberts who emigrated from England. My mother was born 25 July 1843 Nauvoo Hancock County Illinois. She was the first born of 15 children among them were 5 pair of twins.

My grandfather and grandmother viewed the dead bodies of our beloved Prophet Joseph and his brother Hyrum after they had been martyred at Carthage Jail. My grandmother often told of the awful sadness theat prevailed among the saints as their love was so great for their beloved leaders who had been murdered in cold blood. They were afterward buried secretly.

My father being a miller, the family moved from the fort to a mill owned by Brigham Young in City Creek Canyon. We lived there for a time then moved to the city two doors west of the Great Salt Lake Theater.

One Sabbath morning my little sister and I went out of the gate and were lost. We were tired of waiting for our father to go to Sunday School. We wandered west to the old adobe yard some people took us in and questioned us. My father had written out a description of us and sent it to meeting and we were found. This little incident caused me to remember the bowery made to hold meetings in when the Saints first came to the Valley

We moved next to the Jordan Mill now called Murray. My mother now had four children and while there gave birth to a pair of twins boy and a girl. Nearly losing her life, it was here in the stream running by the door, I was baptized by my Father. 1 May 1870 and confirmed by an Elder Farburn. I was now nine years old. I well remember going to Sabbath School. Father was one of the Superintendents of the Sunday School of the Mill Creek Ward . This was one of the joys of my childhood. I attended the first day of school while living here, one half mile from home in an adobe room built for day school. My sister went with me.

Our next move was to Miller's Mill, the Ward called South Cottonwood. My next school was at a private house taught by a lady teacher. We went from there to the school house on the hill taught by Sam Brinton. Because of my mother being in ill health, I was kept out of school two week at a time, this caused me to loose interest in my studies and I learned but little. All of the grades were taught in this little room. I remember we stood in a row and in turn read a verse, we were punished if found writing out of the time for writing. My father ran the flour mill owned by James R. Miller. He was very kind to my father's family and so was his wife Mary.

The saddest trial of my life happened while we were living there. My dear mother gave birth to her seventh child and for the lack of skillful help she died in ten days after the birth of the child of blood poisoning. You can imagine the dreadful condition of things at that time, our dear sweet mother lay cold in death, seven children motherless. My father poor and working hard for a living. We had no home then, we were living in the mill house in two small rooms. Just before my mother died she called me to her and said be a good a girl and kissed me. Those dying words has always prompted me to try to do right. She died at seven o clock in the morning. The sweet soul was dressed in the best they had, not silk or satin but clean and white, dressed in the Temple robe--it was made of linen. She was laid in a casket and placed in a wagon box. The journey to the cemetery was four miles. We stopped at Union Fort and held the funeral. One hymn I remember was "Sweet Rest in Heaven" She was taken to the Union graveyard and buried there. The little infant lived three months and died.

My father married again to Harriet Ann Pearce. Her husband was killed in the canyon by a log rolling on him. She had three children and after my father married they had four children two of them died and two are living yet. After a time I went to live with my Aunt Mary, my mother's sister--Mary and Jo Harker at Vernon Tooele County.

Copyright 1996 - 2018 Shirl R Weight Thursday, 18 January 2018 12:56:06 PM