William Mitchell Ball


Spouse: Elizabeth England

  • Born May 10, 1832 in Swinefleet, Yorkshire, England.
  • Baptized on October 13,1871
  • Married About 1870
  • Sealed June 14, 1923
  • Died August 23, 1916 in Lewisville, Jefferson, Idaho
  • Arrived in Salt Lake on September 30, 1854 (22 years of age)

Elizabeth England joined the Latter-day Saint Church when Alfred Ball was seven years old. William Mitchell Ball had not yet joined the church. (about 1863-64)


History of William Mitchell Ball

Written by Elva Tall Kinghorn

William Mitchell Ball, son of Richard and Hannah Mitchell Ball, was born 10 May 1832 at Swinefleet, Yorkshire, England. He was the seventh child in a family of eight children. Little is know of his boyhood. He married Elizabeth England 1 April 1855. Nector Norton performed the ceremony. He was the father of five children, Hannah, Alfred, Arthur Richard, Matilda, and Heber Orson Ball.

His wife, Elizabeth, was not strong, but with some assistance from her mother she took good care of her family and was never idle. Her fingers were busy making quilts, lace edging, and fancy articles which she sold. She heard the Gospel and accepted it and was baptized.

Grandfather William Mitchell Ball did not accept the Gospel, but her gave her his consent to take her family to America to Utah. When word reached him of her death (24 Feb 1871) he sailed for America to find his children. When he found them, they were each located in good homes with good people, and he realized they would be given care and opportunities. Undecided what best to do and filled with grief, her returned to England where he stayed a year. Then he decided to return to Salt Lake City. He joined the Church and was baptized by John Sears of Salt Lake City on 13 October 1871 and confirmed by the same man. He received his endowments 25 March 1872 in the Salt Lake Temple.

He was a very polished gentleman having a pleasing personality, and he was very immaculate and proud of his appearance. His eyes were deep blue and his hair gray for many years. He wore a silky, shiny mustache and goatee.

He was married several times, but not in polygamy. He married Ann Alice Long, a Mrs. Fanny Machin Merrill by whom he had a son who died I infancy. He and this wife separated. He married a Mrs. Flowers who had money. She was very good to him, and he had a good home with her. When she died, Uncle Alfred, Matilda, and Uncle Heber went to the funeral. I accompanied my mother and remember after the funeral that Grandfather, Matilda, Alfred, and Heber were at the home and that Grandfather decided to come to Idaho to make his home with his children. He chose Alfred to be the administrator, and he chose to make his home with him.

I remember at this time he gave Mother (Matilda) a cook range known as "Miller". It was a left hand stove--the fire box being on the right side and the oven on the left. It didn’t have a reservoir, but a large copper tank sat on the back of it. This was like the large tanks used in making coffee in the eating houses of that day and in this water was always kept hot for dish washing, etc. This stove lasted many years and was taken into the Rigby home when Matilda moved from the farm.

Grandfather had an east room in the log house of Uncle Alfred and Aunt Mary Ann when they lived in Grant vicinity, Lewisville Ward. Grandfather had his meals at the table with the family. His daughter, Matilda, and granddaughter, Coral Tall, did his weekly laundry for him. He was of nervous temperament and had a delicate stomach which gave him distress, and he took soda and water for relief.

In his early days while residing in Salt Lake City, he engaged in freighting and taxi service. When he came to Idaho he always had a fine horse and buggy. He was very proud and his buggy was washed and polished and his horse well fed and groomed. Sometimes he drove in his buggy, sometimes he rode in his saddle. Many times he took Aunt Mary Ann on long journeys traveling around the Rigby Stake visiting primaries for Aunt Mary Ann was Stake Primary President.

When he came to Idaho he told that he had been a pony express rider. Aunt Mary Ann and some of his family doubted the story because of dates of events, but Uncle Heber when asked what he thought would smile and say, "I really don’t know;" but he never offended his father by denying it. Often his picture would be taken at Old Folks’ celebrations in Rigby, and it with a write-up would appear in the paper. One clipping I have in my possession is a picture of he and a friend wearing their old folk badges.

The article reads as follows:

Couple of Boys of Former Days. We herewith present an excellent picture of a couple of our citizens, E. L. Probart (Edward Leroy Probart?) and William Ball. Both attended the Old Folks picnic at Menan and took pleasure in recounting scenes of early days here in the West. Mr. Probart was a stage driver out of Salt Lake, while Mr. Ball was a pony express rider. Both had many escapes from Indians and highway robbers."

Many listeners were convicted these stories were true, but when Aunt Mary Ann saw these articles in the paper she would scold and scold Grandfather; but he believed his own story and never did deny it. He has an U.S. Money bag in his possession and he gave it to his friend, Robert Gilcrist who believed his story. And at his funeral Robert Gilchrist was a speaker. He showed the U.S. money bag and said Grandfather had been a Pony Express Rider and that because of their friendship he had given this bag to him. Again members of the family were embarrassed and doubted the tale.

One day when riding his horse, he came up on the west side of our farm from Uncle Alfred’s and my Father, John Tall, was plowing with a team of horses and a hand plow. Perhaps the furrows were not very straight. Anyway, when Father came to the end of the field near the road, Grandfather tied his horse to a post and said, "I’ll start you a straight furrow in that next land and teach you how to turn the following furrows. This he did which indicates that at perhaps some earlier time in his life in England he had farmed. Grandfather never engaged in physical work when he came to Idaho. He spent his time riding, visiting, and doing errands.

One day he met in Rigby Mrs. Fannie Merrill (Carr), his former wife from whom he had separated. She was living with her daughter, Mr. Barrows, in a home near the Utah-Idaho Sugar factory in Rigby. He courted her again, and they wanted to remarry. When he told Aunt Mary Ann she said, "No, No, No." When he asked Uncle Heber what he thought about it, he said "Well, Father, you are of legal age--do what you want to do."

Well he didn’t. When Alfred and Mary Ann left their farm and came to Lewisville to live, he came too and had a one-room frame house near the home located where A. Vernon Ball now lives.

I remember two compliments Grandfather gave me when he was visiting in our home. I was a young girl and prepared to wash the dishes after a meal he had had with us. I cleared the table, putting remaining food, etc. in the pantry. Then I shook the table cloth having stacked the dishes to be washed. I raised the lid off the coffee tank and with a quart cup carried water from stove to dishpan on the table putting the lid of the tank under the quart cup so as not to have drops of water fall to the floor. For being particular he complemented me.

Another time when I had picked a fallen article from the floor and put it in place he took time to tell me this story; "A young man was in love with two sisters. He couldn’t decide which one to ask to be his wife. One day while at their home some company drove up in a buggy. Both girls were eager to see and welcome them and ran from the house to the gate. The first girl brushed too close to a standing broom which fell at her feet. She quickly stepped over and on she went. The second girl stopped picked up the broom, put it in place, and then hurried out to welcome the guests. "Now," said Grandfather, "Which girl do you think the young man asked to marry him?"

His Granddaughter, Cora, was always very good to him, inviting him to her home where she cooked calves’ brains for him because he liked the dish and other members of the family didn’t especially care to cook it.

Aunt Mary Ann was very good to him. She was an excellent cook and served good meals. His daughter, Mathilda, would cater to him when he came visiting and make Yorkshire pudding.

We are grateful for his good life--that he came to America, joined the Church and lived to be near and associate with all his children.

In this later years when sickness came he had the Elders administer to him and he said, "I have not lost the faith." Matilda, his daughter, spent the last days of his sickness at Alfred’s home where she could assist in his care. He died in his room at Lewisville, Idaho at 9:00 p.m. on 23 Aug 1916.

William Mitchell Ball was sealed to his first wife, Elizabeth England by Proxies Alfred Ball and Matilda Ball Tall, his son and daughter.


WILLIAM MITCHELL BALL

(Elisabeth England)



  • Born: May 10, 1832
  • Place: Swinefleet, Yorkshire, England.
  • Married: April 1, 1855
  • Place:
  • Died: August 23, 1916
  • Place: Lewisville, Jefferson, Idaho
  • Baptized: October 13,1871
  • Arrived in Salt Lake City by steam in 1871. He was 39 years of age.

Children

1. Hannah Ball 5 October 1855 Brightside, Yorkshire, England

2. Alfred Ball* 23 November 1856 Brightside, Yorkshire, England

3. Richard Arthur Ball 25 January 1859 Brightside, Yorkshire, England

4. Matilda Ball 4 January 1863 Brightside, Yorkshire, England

5. Heber Orson Ball 4 November 1865 Brightside, Yorkshire, England


Other Wives (not in Polygamy)

Ann Alice Long

Mrs. Fanny Machin Merrill (had a son who died in infancy)

Mrs. Flowers


(History written by Elva Tall Kinghorn)

History of William Mitchell Ball

Written by Elva Tall Kinghorn



William Mitchell Ball, son of Richard and Hannah Mitchell Ball, was born 10 May 1832 at Swinefleet, Yorkshire, England. He was the seventh child in a family of eight children. Little is known of his boyhood. He married Elisabeth England on 1 April 1855. Nector Norton performed the ceremony. He was the father of five children, Hannah, Alfred, Arthur Richard, Matilda, and Heber Orson Ball.



His wife, Elizabeth, was not strong, but with some assistance from her mother she took good care of her family and was never idle. Her fingers were busy making quilts, lace edging, and fancy articles which she sold. She heard the Gospel and accepted it and was baptized.



Grandfather William Mitchell Ball did not accept the Gospel, but he gave her his consent to take her family to America to Utah. When word reached him of her death he sailed for America to find his children. When he found them, they were each located in good homes with good people, and he realized they would be given care and opportunities. Undecided what best to do and filled with grief, he returned to England where he stayed a year. Then he decided to return to Salt Lake City. He joined the church and was baptized by John Sears of Salt Lake City on 13 October 1871 and confirmed by the same man. He received his endowments 25 March 1872 in the Salt Lake Temple.



He was a very polished gentleman having a pleasing personality, and he was very immaculate and proud of his appearance. His eyes were deep blue and his hair gray for many years. He wore a silky, shiny mustache and goatee. He was married several times, but not in polygamy. He married Ann Alice Long, a Mrs. Fanny Machin Merrill by whom he had a son who died in infancy. He and this wife separated. He married a Mrs. Flowers who had money. She was very good to him, and he had a good home with her. When she died, Uncle Alfred, Matilda, and Uncle Heber went to the funeral. I accompanied my mother and remember after the funeral that Grandfather, Matilda, Alfred, and Heber were at the home and that Grandfather decided to come to Idaho to make his home with his children. He chose Alfred to be the administrator, and he chose to make his home with him. I remember at this time he gave Mother (Matilda) a cook range known as "Miller". It was a left hand stove--the fire box being on the right side and the oven on the left. It didn't have a reservoir, but a large copper tank sat on the back of it. This was like the large tanks used in making coffee in the eating houses of that day and in this water was always kept hot for dish washing, etc. This stove lasted many years and was taken into the Rigby home when Matilda moved from the farm.



Grandfather had an east room in the log house of Uncle Alfred and Aunt Mary Ann when they lived in Grant vicinity, Lewisville Ward. Grandfather had his meals at the table with the family. His daughter, Matilda, and granddaughter, Coral Tall, did his weekly laundry for him. He was of nervous temperament and had a delicate stomach which gave him distress, and he took soda and water for relief.



In his early days while residing in Salt Lake City, he engaged in freighting and taxi service. When he came to Idaho he always had a fine horse and buggy. He was very proud and his buggy was washed and polished and his horse well fed and groomed. Sometimes he drove in his buggy, sometimes he rode in his saddle. Many times he took Aunt Mary Ann on long journeys traveling around the Rigby Stake visiting primaries for Aunt Mary Ann was Stake Primary President.



When he came to Idaho he told that he had been a pony express rider. Aunt Mary Ann and some of his family doubted the story because of dates of events, but Uncle Heber when asked what he thought would smile and say, "I really don't know;" but he never offended his father by denying it. Often his picture would be taken at Old Folks' celebrations in Rigby, and it with a write-up would appear in the paper. One clipping I have in my possession is a picture of he and a friend wearing their old folk badges. The article reads as follows: "Couple of Boys of Former Days. We herewith present an excellent picture of a couple of our citizens, E. L. Probart and William Ball. Both attended the Old Folks picnic at Menan and took pleasure in recounting scenes of early days here in the West. Mr. Probart was a stage driver out of Salt Lake, while Mr. Ball was a pony express rider. Both had many escapes from Indians and highway robbers."



Many listeners were convicted these stories were true, but when Aunt Mary Ann saw these articles in the paper she would scold and scold Grandfather; but he believed his own story and never did deny it. He has an U.S. Money bag in his possession and he gave it to his friend, Robert Gilcrist who believed his story. And at his funeral Robert Gilchrist was a speaker. He showed the U.S. money bag and said grandfather had been a Pony Express Rider and that because of their friendship he had given this bag to him. Again members of the family were embarrassed and doubted the tale.



One day when riding his horse, he came up on the west side of our farm from Uncle Alfred's and my Father, John Tall, was plowing with a team of horses and a hand plow. Perhaps the furrows were not very straight. Anyway, when Father came to the end of the field near the road, grandfather tied his horse to a post and said, "I'll start you a straight furrow in that next land and teach you how to turn the following furrows. This he did which indicates that at perhaps some earlier time in his life in England he had farmed. Grandfather never engaged in physical work when he came to Idaho. He spent his time riding, visiting, and doing errands.



One day he met in Rigby Mrs. Fannie Merrill (Carr), his former wife from whom he had separated. She was living with her daughter, Mr. Barrows, in a home near the Utah-Idaho Sugar factory in Rigby. He courted her again, and they wanted to remarry. When he told Aunt Mary Ann she said, "No, No, No." When he asked Uncle Heber what he thought about it, he said "Well, Father, you are of legal age--do what you want to do."



Well he didn't. When Alfred and Mary Ann left their farm and came to Lewisville to live, he came too and had a one-room frame house near the home located where A. Vernon Ball now lives.



I remember two compliments Grandfather gave me when he was visiting in our home. I was a young girl and prepared to wash the dishes after a meal he had had with us. I cleared the table, putting remaining food, etc. in the pantry. Then I shook the table cloth having stacked the dishes to be washed. I raised the lid off the coffee tank and with a quart cup carried water from stove to dishpan on the table putting the lid of the tank under the quart cup so as not to have drops of water fall to the floor. For being particular he complemented me.



Another time when I had picked a fallen article from the floor and put it in place he took time to tell me this story; "A young man was in love with two sisters. He couldn't decide which one to ask to be his wife. One day while at their home some company drove up in a buggy. Both girls were eager to see and welcome them and ran from the house to the gate. The first girl brushed too close to a standing broom which fell at her feet. She quickly stepped over and on she went. The second girl stopped picked up the broom, put it in place, and then hurried out to welcome the guests. "Now," said Grandfather, "Which girl do you think the young man asked to marry him?"



His Granddaughter, Cora, was always very good to him, inviting him to her home where she cooked calves' brains for him because he liked the dish and other members of the family didn't especially care to cook it.



Aunt Mary Ann was very good to him. She was an excellent cook and served good meals. His daughter, Mathilda, would cater to him when he came visiting and make Yorkshire pudding.



We are grateful for his good life--that he came to America, joined the Church and lived to be near and associate with all his children.



In this later years when sickness came he had the Elders administer to him and he said, "I have not lost the faith." Matilda, his daughter, spent the last days of his sickness at Alfred's home where she could assist in his care. He died in his room at Lewisville, Idaho at 9:00 p.m. on 23 August 1916.



William Mitchell Ball was sealed to his first wife, Elizabeth England by Proxies Alfred Ball and Matilda Ball Tall, his son and daughter.

Copyright Shirl R. Weight 08/03/09 07:52:17 PM

Copyright 1996 - 2018 Shirl R Weight Thursday, 18 January 2018 12:56:06 PM