Alfred Ball


Spouse: Mary Ann Walker

  • Born: November 23, 1856 in Brightside, Yorkshire, England
  • Baptized: April 11, 1871
  • Married: October 17, 1877 in Vernon, Tooele, Utah
  • Sealed: August 7, 1879
  • Died: January 29, 1935 in Lewisville, Jefferson, Idaho
  • Arrived in Salt Lake City by steam (the first pioneer company to come all of the way from England by steam) on August 5, 1870--age 14).

Alfred Ball was born 23 of November 1856 at Brightside Yorkshire England.

His father's name was William Mitchell Ball, his mother Elizabeth England. She was the mother of five children two girls, three boys, Hannah, Matilda, Alfred, Arthur, and Heber. They were poor people.

When Alfred was quite young he went to school half day and worked the other half. He worked in the cotton factory tying knots to set the loom for weaving cloth, and in the iron mines such jobs as packing coal to keep the furnace going and so on.

Elizabeth England started with her five children, leaving Liverpool on the Steamship Manhattan, came all the way from Liverpool to New York and from New York to Salt Lake City by steam. The first company that came all the way by steam landed in Salt Lake City on Aug 5, 1870. There were over four hundred in the company. Among them were returned missionaries and the late Karl G. Maeser. Elizabeth England lived until 24 Feb 1871 when she died and left her five children in the care of the Saints, anywhere they might find a home and work.

Alfred came across a good man named Joseph Harker from Taylorsville who took him and gave him a good home and took care of him for some years. He became the tender of flocks of sheep for Brother Harker and his sons. He was living at this time in Vernon, Tooele County and was baptized in Vernon April 11, 1871. He was 15 years old.

As young man at the age of twenty one he met his wife Mary Ann Walker and was married to her 17 Oct. 1877, by Apostle T. M. Lyman. They lived in Vernon where two children were born Alfred and Orson and then moved to Salt Lake Valley Union Ward. The other children were born there, nine in all.

The family moved to Idaho in 1901 and have lived in Lewisville the that time.

At this writing he is 77 (1933-34?) years old, fairly well in health.

  • He enjoys long walks each day.
  • One very splendid trait in his character he is strictly honest and always delights to pay his honest debts.
  • He is kind to is family and all whom he comes to meet.
  • He freely gives to the poor.
  • He is a man of not many words and sound in his judgement.
  • He is very clean and particularly especially in his taste for food; very much set in his habits in life; always shunning publicity.
  • He is a good provider and his family has never wanted or food.
  • He supported three of his sons on missions and never murmured but took delight in them going on missions.
  • His enjoyment most of all are contestant games.
  • He has a reading habit.
  • He once refused to take a ride in an airplane with his wife saying the ground was good enough for him.

As young man he was a good hunter. They called him "sure shot." Once he killed a large grisly bear and always killed his deer when he aimed at it. Hunting was great sport for him in his middle age.

He has been a full tithe payer since 1916 when coming to this Lewisville farm. He has been ordained to the Aaronic and Melchezidec Priesthood and holds the office of High Priest, was ordained to this office under the hands of Apostle Charles W. Penrose 4 Dec 1910.

He was sealed to his wife 7 Aug 1879 at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City.

(Biography written by Mary Ann Walker Ball for her grandchildren)


History of Alfred Ball

Written by Elva Tall Kinghorn

Alfred Ball was born 23 November 1856 at Brightside, Yorkshire, England. He was the son of William Mitchell Ball and Elizabeth England. He had two brothers, Arthur Richard Ball and Heber Orson Ball and two sisters, Hannah and Matilda Ball.

They were poor people and each member of the family was taught to work. When Alfred was of school age, he went to work one-half day and attended school one-half day. He worked in the cotton factory tying knots to set the loom for the weaving of cloth. He also worked in the iron mines keeping furnace fires burning. Any job he could get at his age he accepted and did his work well and satisfactory.

When his mother joined the L.D.S. Church he was seven years of age, and he had a part in earning and saving pennies for the fund which was to be used to bring them to America. They left Liverpool, England, on the steamship Manhattan and arrived in New York City. From there, they journeyed by train to Salt Lake City, Utah. They were in the first company that came all the way by steam. They landed in Salt Lake City on 5 August 1870. There were over 400 immigrants and missionaries, among them the late Karl G. Maeser.

His mother lived until 24 February 1871 when she died of cancer leaving her five children in care of Saints who gave them work and a home.

A very good man, Joseph Harker, from Taylorville, Utah, took Alfred to his home and gave him good care. He became the tender of flocks of sheep for Brother Harker and his sons. He was living at this time in Vernon, Tooele, Utah. he was baptized on 11 April 1871.

When a young man of 21, he met Mary Ann Walker at Vernon and there they were married on 17 October 1877 by Apostle Francis M. Lyman. There they made a three room home, and there his first two sons, Alfred William and Orson, were born. His wife was only sixteen when they married. They moved from there to Union, Salt Lake Co, Utah. Here the resided in a nice brick home. In this home nine children were born, three of whom died in infancy.

Alfred Ball and Mary Ann Walker Ball were the parents of the following children; Alfred William Ball, Orson, Zina Elizabeth, Lyman James, Lorenzo Craig (a twin), Erastus (Twin that died at birth), Laura Clair, Zella (lived six hours), Edith (lived nine hours), Irvin Mar, and Velma Mary.

Their home was a pretty home in Union, but they only had thirty acres of land, not sufficient to support or give work to their sons so in the year 1901 they moved to a farm in Lewisville where they could farm and engage in sheep business. It was disappointing to leave a pretty brick house and come to a four room log house with a summer kitchen connected to the hose by a board walk and a path instead of a bath to the restroom hidden among the trees. But the walls of this home were kept snowy white, frequently being dalsomined with white lime. Pretty curtains hung to the windows, an organ and good furniture added to the beauty, comfort, and homeyness.

Alfred’s children attended school, some of whom went to Ricks Academy at Rexburg, Idaho. Two sons were in the mission field at one time. Alfred was a good farmer and raised sheep and supported his family well. His wife assisted greatly in this task by making pounds and pounds of butter to sell to help support these missionary sons.

On winter days or days when the men had the field work done--it could have been in the late Autumn, they had a wood cutting bee at Uncle Alfred’s. Neighbor men went with their sharp axes and cut wood making a big pile to assist the Ball family in the absence of the two missionaries. The women assembled, cooked, and served a good meal. I remember my Father, John Tall, and my Mother, Matilda Tall, went as did also a brother Harper who said when he left, "Well, I’m going home. I’ve cut as much wood today as one missionary would have cut."

Alfred was a man of sterling character--strictly honest for he took delight in paying his taxes, his debts. He was kind to his family and to all he met. He was generous to the poor, quiet, retiring, gentle in nature, a man of few words but sound judgment. He disliked publicity or show. He was extremely strict about being prompt. He was always on time and expected others to be as prompt as he. He was very honest and taught that all money should be taken care of and not left lying around to tempt child or adult.

While limited in education, he enjoyed reading and he learned from experience. He always enjoyed taking walks. He would rather take a good long walk where he meditated and found reverence in Nature than to attend Church meetings. He enjoyed contest games, hunting, etc. In his middle years he was a good hunter, deriving the name "Sure Short". He killed many deer and some bear. Hunting was is favorite sport.

He lived in the days of ox teams, wagons, buggies, and automobiles. He watched the progress of speed in travel and the traffic. He owned and drove a car. When his wife was seventy years of age on 24 July 1930, she took a ride in an airplane. She urged her husband to accompany her, but he refused saying, "The good old earth is good enough for me."

He was a very clean, particular man, very set in his habits and fussy in his taste for food. He expected baking powder hot biscuits, cooked cereal, cream, fruit jams, and preserves for breakfast. Plum puddings, Yorkshire puddings, roast leg of lamb and the best of food was served at their table.

He made one more move into the vicinity of Lewisville where he had a farm and a home in the town site. Here he retired.

All of his children but one were married in the Temple. None of his five sons ever acquired the habit of smoking. They were good citizens and builders in the community, giving employment to many people.

Sad trials came to him and his good wife. They lost four grown children. Zina died at the age of fourteen of typhoid fever. She was a pretty girl and a beautiful singer. Laura Clair, mother of two children, died of pneumonia; and a son, Orson, father of ten children died of pneumonia. Another son, Alfred William, died a short time before him because of a heart condition. These were severe trials to bear in their declining years.

Alfred Ball was sealed to his wife, Mary Ann Walker, in the Salt Lake Endowment House on 7 August 1879 by Daniel H. Wells. Their eldest son, Alfred William, was sealed to them on 13 June 1923. The other children were all born under the covenant. During his life in Idaho he and his wife, sister and father went to the Salt Lake temple to do the work for his parents.

He died at his home in Lewisville on 29 January 1935.


ALFRED BALL

(Mary Ann Walker)

  • Born: November 23, 1856
  • Place: Brightside, Yorkshire, England
  • Married: October 17, 1877
  • Place: Vernon, Tooele, Utah
  • Died: January 29, 1935
  • Place: Lewisville, Jefferson Idaho
  • Baptized: April 11, 1871
  • Arrived in Salt Lake City: August 5, 1870. He was 14 years old.

The first Pioneer Company to come all of the way from England under steam. He left Liverpool July 13, 1870 on the "Manhattan", arrived July 26, 1870 in New York. There were 269 in the company. The church leader was Karl G. Maeser-age 14 years).

Children

  • Alfred Wm Ball 3 August 1878 Vernon, Tooele, Utah
  • Orson Ball 24 November 189 Vernon, Tooele, Utah
  • Lyman Ball 12 April 1884 Union, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Zina Ball 13 September 1881 Union, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Lorenzo Craig Ball 17 February 1887 Union, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Erastus Ball 17 February 1887 Union, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Laura Clair Ball 30 November 1889 Union, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Edith Ball Union, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Zella Ball Union, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Irvin Ball 15 September 1895 Union, Salt Lake, Utah
  • Velma Mary* 23 October 1898 Union, Salt Lake, Utah

(Biography written by Mary Ann Walker Ball for their grandchildren)

Your Grandfather was born 23 of November 1856 at Brightside Yorkshire England. His father's name was William Mitchell Ball, his mother's Elizabeth England. She was the mother of five children: two girls, three boys, Hannah, Matilda, Alfred, Arthur, and Heber. They were poor people. When your grandfather was quite young he went to school half day and worked the other half. He worked in the cotton factory tying knots to set the loom for weaving cloth, and in the iron mines at such jobs as packing coal to keep the furnace going and so on.

His mother joined the Latter-day Saint Church when he was seven years old. She was planning to come to Zion with the little savings she could save and help from the Emigration Fund. They prepared to leave England. His father not yet had joined the church. At that time a very remarkable healing took place. Their belongings had been sent on ahead and while at her mother's she was taken very dangerously sick and given up by the doctor to die. They sent for some Elders to come and administer to her. She had one desire, to live and take her children to Zion. The Elders administered to her, and it was an almost instant healing. In three days she was able to go on farther. Her gentile neighbors said she had had shoe oil rubbed on her head. She started with her five children, leaving Liverpool on the Steamship Manhattan, came all the way from Liverpool to New York and from New York to Salt Lake City by steam. The first company that came all the way by steam landed in Salt Lake City on August 5, 1870. There were over four hundred in the company. Among them were returned missionaries and the late Karl G. Maeser. Great grandmother lived until 24 February1871 when she died and left her five children in the care of the Saints, anywhere they might find a home and work. Alfred, your grandfather, came across a good man named Joseph Harker from Taylorsville who took him and gave him a good home and took care of him for some years. He became the tender of flocks of sheep for Brother Harker and his sons. He was living at this time in Vernon, Tooele County and was baptized in Vernon April 11, 1871. He was 15 years old.

He was now a young man at the age of twenty one and here he met his wife Mary Ann Walker and was married to her 17 October 1877 by Apostle T. M. Lyman. They lived in Vernon where two children were born Alfred and Orson and then moved to Salt Lake Valley, Union Ward. The other children were born there, nine in all. We moved to Idaho in 1901 and have lived in Lewisville since that time. At this writing he is 77 years old, fairly well in health. He enjoys long walks each day. One very splendid trait in his character is that he is strictly honest and always delights to pay his honest debts. He is kind to his family and all whom he comes to meet. He freely gives to the poor. He is a man of not many words and sound in his judgement. He is very clean and particularly especially in his taste for food; very much set in his habits in life; always shunning publicity. He is a good provider and his family has never wanted for food. He supported three of his sons on missions and never murmured, but took delight in them going on missions. His enjoyment most of all is contestant games. He has a reading habit. He once refused to take a ride in an airplane with his wife saying the ground was good enough for him.

When a young man he was a good hunter. They called him "sure shot." Once he killed a large grisly bear and always killed his deer when he aimed at it. Hunting was great sport for him in his middle age. He has been a full tithe payer since 1916 when coming to this Lewisville farm. He has been ordained to the Aaronic and Melchizedek Priesthood and holds the office of High Priest, he was ordained to this office under the hands of Apostle Charles W. Penrose 4 December 1910. He was sealed to his wife 7 August 1879 at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City.


History of Alfred Ball

Written by Elva Tall Kinghorn

Alfred Ball was born 23 November 1856 at Brightside, Yorkshire, England. He was the son of William Mitchell Ball and Elizabeth England. He had two brothers, Arthur Richard Ball and Heber Orson Ball and two sisters, Hannah and Matilda Ball.

They were poor people and each member of the family was taught to work. When Alfred was of school age, he went to work one-half day and attended school one-half day. He worked in the cotton factory tying knots to set the loom for the weaving of cloth. He also worked in the iron mines keeping furnace fires burning. Any job he could get at his age he accepted and did his work well and satisfactory.

When his mother joined the L.D.S. Church he was seven years of age, and he had a part in earning and saving pennies for the fund which was to be used to bring them to America. They left Liverpool, England, on the steamship "Manhattan" and arrived in New York City. From there, they journeyed by train to Salt Lake City, Utah. They were in the first company that came all the way by steam. They landed in Salt Lake City on 5 August 1870. There were over 400 immigrants and missionaries, among them the late Karl G. Maeser.

His mother lived until 24 February 1871 when she died of cancer leaving her five children in care of Saints who gave them work and a home.

A very good man, Joseph Harker, from Taylorville, Utah, took Alfred to his home and gave him good care. He became the tender of flocks of sheep for Brother Harker and his sons. He was living at this time in Vernon, Tooele, Utah. he was baptized on 11 April 1871.

When a young man of 21, he met Mary Ann Walker at Vernon and there they were married on 17 October 1877 by Apostle Francis M. Lyman. There they made a three room home, and there his first two sons, Alfred William and Orson, were born. His wife was only sixteen when they married. They moved from there to Union, Salt Lake Co, Utah. Here the resided in a nice brick home. In this home nine children were born, three of whom died in infancy.

Alfred Ball and Mary Ann Walker Ball were the parents of the following children; Alfred William Ball, Orson, Zina Elizabeth, Lyman James, Lorenzo Craig (a twin), Erastus (Twin that died at birth), Laura Clair, Zella (lived six hours), Edith (lived nine hours), Irvin Mar, and Velma Mary.

Their home was a pretty home in Union, but they only had thirty acres of land, not sufficient to support or give work to their sons so in the year 1901 they moved to a farm in Lewisville where they could farm and engage in sheep business. It was disappointing to leave a pretty brick house and come to a four room log house with a summer kitchen connected to the house by a board walk and a path instead of a bath to the restroom hidden among the trees. But the walls of this home were kept snowy white, frequently being dalsomined with white lime. Pretty curtains hung to the windows, an organ and good furniture added to the beauty, comfort, and hominess.

Alfred's children attended school, some of whom went to Ricks Academy at Rexburg, Idaho. Two sons were in the mission field at one time. Alfred was a good farmer and raised sheep and supported his family well. His wife assisted greatly in this task by making pounds and pounds of butter to sell to help support these missionary sons.

On winter days or days when the men had the field work done--it could have been in the late Autumn, they had a wood cutting bee at Uncle Alfred's. Neighbor men went with their sharp axes and cut wood making a big pile to assist the Ball family in the absence of the two missionaries. The women assembled, cooked, and served a good meal. I remember my Father, John Tall, and my Mother, Matilda Tall, went as did also a brother Harper who said when he left, "Well, I'm going home. I've cut as much wood today as one missionary would have cut."

Alfred was a man of sterling character--strictly honest for he took delight in paying his taxes, his debts. He was kind to his family and to all he met. He was generous to the poor, quiet, retiring, gentle in nature, a man of few words but sound judgment. He disliked publicity or show. He was extremely strict about being prompt. He was always on time and expected others to be as prompt as he. He was very honest and taught that all money should be taken care of and not left lying around to tempt child or adult.

While limited in education, he enjoyed reading and he learned from experience. He always enjoyed taking walks. He would rather take a good long walk where he meditated and found reverence in Nature than to attend Church meetings. He enjoyed contest games, hunting, etc. In his middle years he was a good hunter, deriving the name "Sure Short". He killed many deer and some bear. Hunting was his favorite sport.

He lived in the days of ox teams, wagons, buggies, and automobiles. He watched the progress of speed in travel and the traffic. He owned and drove a car. When his wife was seventy years of age on 24 July 1930, she took a ride in an airplane. She urged her husband to accompany her, but he refused saying, "The good old earth is good enough for me."

He was a very clean, particular man, very set in his habits and fussy in his taste for food. He expected baking powder hot biscuits, cooked cereal, cream, fruit jams, and preserves for breakfast. Plum puddings, Yorkshire puddings, roast leg of lamb and the best of food was served at their table.

He made one more move into the vicinity of Lewisville where he had a farm and a home in the town site. Here he retired.

All of his children but one were married in the temple. None of his five sons ever acquired the habit of smoking. They were good citizens and builders in the community, giving employment to many people.

Sad trials came to him and his good wife. They lost four grown children. Zina died at the age of fourteen of typhoid fever. She was a pretty girl and a beautiful singer. Laura Clair, mother of two children, died of pneumonia; and a son, Orson, father of ten children died of pneumonia. Another son, Alfred William, died a short time before him because of a heart condition. These were severe trials to bear in their declining years.

Alfred Ball was sealed to his wife, Mary Ann Walker, in the Salt Lake Endowment House on 7 August 1879 by Daniel H. Wells. Their eldest son, Alfred William, was sealed to them on 13 June 1923. The other children were all born under the covenant. During his life in Idaho he and his wife, sister and father went to the Salt Lake Temple to do the work for his parents.

He died at his home in Lewisville on 29 January 1935.


(Taken from "Remembering Thoughts and Deeds" by Sidney L. Wyatt)

Alfred Ball was one of the closest friends I ever had-even if he was so much older than I. I first met him on that cold January evening in 1919. I had recently returned from my mission to Ireland and had come to Lewisville for the purpose of becoming engaged to his daughter. I had waited a long time for this happening and was impatient to get it over with. Velma was not aware that I was coming on this day, so when I arrived in Rigby by train, I arranged with a man at a garage to take me to Lewisville. I intended to stay at a hotel. There was a place, a Walker family, that sometimes boarded traveling salesmen, etc. and I got a room with them. It was after dark when I arrived. There had been a heavy fall of snow but the snow plow had been along the paths and they were open. I followed directions and soon approached the Ball residence. I was not well enough acquainted to know that Velma was the youngest child or to know that she and Irvin were the only children at home. When the door was opened to my knock I saw Velma for the first time in nearly four years. She had just finished doing the supper dishes she wore a frilly bibbed apron. Her hair was piled high over her forehead. Although somewhat flustered at my unexpected appearance she received me with a warm handshake.

Her father was sitting in his arm chair near the kitchen range reading the current issue of the Deseret News. At sixty-three years of age he was slender in build and straight as a ramrod. He had a good head of grey hair and a full set of his own teeth. In manner he was deceptively quiet giving an impression that he may be dominated by his "Jennie Wren" of a wife. The facts were the opposite.

He was a man of strong will and fixed habits. His life had not been an easy one. Emigrating from England as a boy he had spent much of his life as a tender of sheep in Tooele county, Utah. About eighteen years before I met him, he had moved to Idaho as a pioneer. With the help of his wife he had been able to overcome "Word of Wisdom" problems. He was one of the most upright men I have ever met. He lived the gospel, paid his tithing, sent two of his sons on missions, and helped to establish all of them in business.

The first visit I spent with Velma was a short one. By ten-o-clock I was back at my boarding house, but I had left an engagement ring. The next day, Velma was teaching school. I called on Brother and Sister Ball and ask their permission to marry their daughter. Velma got a couple of days leave from school and she and I went to Rexburg for a visit to Ricks and a chance to become better acquainted.

I began to become better acquainted with Brother Ball soon after we were married. We were visiting at his home during the time he was harvesting fire wood for the coming year. There was a grove of cotton wood trees on his land near a branch of the Snake River known as Dry Bed. We would cut the trees down, split them into rails and then Velma's's brother Irving wold cut them into stove lengths with a saw powered by an old Ford motor. I remember that the weather was very cold and as I drove the ax into a frozen tree a large wedge of the blade broke off and ruined the ax.

During the depression of the thirties my family spent a number of summer vacations from school with Velma's parents. They seemed to be glad of our company. Velma took care of the housework and I helped Brother Ball with the farm work. He was perhaps the most particular farmer I have ever known. There must be no weeds in his beet fields or potatoes. Irrigation must be done perfectly. As he became older I was truly flattered when he contented himself to walk to the post office, get the mail and sit in his rocker on the porch while I did the irrigation. It was a real tribute to be so trusted.

Brother Ball and I had many fishing trips together. They were as systematically planned and executed as were his eating habits. It would begin on Monday. As Sister Ball was not always as enthusiastic as we were about these trips she was usually left out of the planning. Brother Ball would get Velma aside and say, "Peggy, will you bake us a bun so brown?" This was always a pleasure, and with a cake, bread and some eggs from the hen house, we would add a slab of bacon and other necessities. Tuesday morning early we would start for the South Fork of the Snake River. I had a comfortable tent which we would pitch at Calamity Point or Whiskey Run, or the Swinging Bridge. In any of these places and more, there were beautiful groves of Quacking Aspen. In those days there was little traffic over the twisting dirt roads. Seldom would you see another fisherman. Brother Ball would never fish. But he greatly enjoyed being out in the wilderness. As I fished to my hearts content he would cook the meals and gather a huge pile of dry wood. When super was over and darkness closed around about us we would sit by the cheery campfire and he would tell stories of bygone days-mostly of sheep tales, and deer hunts. These fishing trips occurred almost weekly during many summers. They were some of the most perfect days of my life. When Alf Ball died I was parted from one of the dearest friends of my life.

Copyright Shirl R. Weight 08/03/09 07:47:14 PM

Copyright 1996 - 2018 Shirl R Weight Thursday, 22 March 2018 04:48:43 PM